FX Update – July 22 – Dollar & Yen Down

AUDUSD, H1

The Euro, along with the Aussie and Kiwi Dollars, posted fresh highs against the Dollar and Yen, despite a backdrop of flagging stock markets. EURUSD reached its highest level since January 2019, at 1.1547, the culmination of what has now been a five-week rally. EURJPY pegged a fresh six-week high at 123.34. Most other Euro crosses are also firmer, though remain below recent highs. Cable has moved below 1.2700, to 1.2660, below Tuesday’s six-week peak at 1.2768. USDJPY plied a narrow range just above the one-week low seen yesterday at 106.68, while EURJPY and the risk-sensitive AUDJPY scaled to respective six-week highs. GBPJPY and CADJPY, in contrast, remained below their respective six-week highs, which had been printed yesterday. AUDUSD reached a new 15-month peak at 0.7165, while NZDUSD ascended further into 18-month high territory. USDCAD settled around the 1.3450 mark, above the six-week low seen yesterday at 1.3422, concomitant with front-month USOil futures at $41.50, below the three-and-a-half month peak that was left at $42.40 yesterday.

Gold and silver prices have continued to surge, reflecting investors’ expectation for global monetary stimulus taps to remain open and the Dollar to remain weak. The gains in the non-yielding assets also reflect concerns that inflation might spike as a consequence of the stimulus. XAUUSD rallied to $1865 earlier before cooling to the $1850 zone, whilst XAGUSD ran to $22.80 (October 2013 highs) before trimming gains to R1 at $21.70.

In other news, the UK’s Telegraph newspaper reported that the UK government is pessimistic about reaching a trade deal with the EU, just days before Prime Minister Johnston’s end-of-July deadline for reaching a deal in principle. The FT also reported, citing unnamed senior government officials, that the UK government has abandoned hopes for reaching a trade deal with the US before the presidential election in November, which means that there will be zero hope for a deal by the time Britain leaves the EU’s single market at the end of the year. The pandemic gets the blame for the slow progress.

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